Um lenço do namorados para Sara

This time it has nothing to do with Science. Although this post is about a present for a scientist friend of mine, Sara.

Sara comes from Viana do Castello, in Portugal. They’ve got a beautiful traditional needlecraft: Os lenços do namorados (Sweetheart Handkerchiefs or Fiancée Handkerchiefs). They are handkerchiefs made of linen or cotton and embroidered with several related love patterns.

The handkerchief was embroidered in free moments of the day by the in-loved girl who would transpose her feelings into the handkerchief, like if she was writing a love letter. Then, she would use it on Sunday and later she would offer it to the boy she loved. If he agreed to the relationship, he would wear it around his neck or in the pocket of the Sunday best.

For my very own version of a ‘lenço do namorados’ I used some traditional motifs, like hearts and flowers, and some unexpected ones, like a gecko, to customize it for Sara (she works on geckos and lizards).

lenço de namorados lenço de namorados

The next phrase is from a Portuguese song. You can listen to it in this video. Sorry, I couldn’t find any one better. Don’t even pay attention to the image. It has nothing to do with the song.  lenço de namorados lenço de namorados lenço de namorados

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Chromosomes hanging from the tree

It took me a while to post the pictures, but finally, here they are: the chromosomes.

They come in a set of 4 in different colours: blue, yellow, purple and green. I hand screenprinted them on 100% cotton fabric and then stuff them with doll stuffing.

Drop me an email or visit my etsy shop if you would like to purchase them.

At the bottom of the post you can see some pictures of my very own chromosomes. A friend of mine took the pictures for me a few years ago. I love them!

chromosomes

Chromosomes Chromosomes Chromosomes Chromosomes Chromosomes

My own ones!

Image

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Chromosomes by Science is coming to town is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Christmas cards

I’ve made my own Christmas cards this year. Obviously they had to do with Science and these are the ideas I came up with.

Sir Isaac Newton happened to be born on December 25th. So, why not celebrate it?

apple_red apple_white

I also made this card in which even genes seem to wish us happy holidays.

HappyHolRedHappyHolGreen

Charles Darwin’s first phylogenetic tree looks like a snowflake, isn’t it?

snow

And why not celebrate that Earth went around the Sun one more time?

WeMadeIt

I hope that my friends love them!

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This work by Science is coming to town is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Ready for Christmas shopping? III

Here you have the third list to help you with you Christmas presents. This time it is Biology. Beautiful bacteria, cells, chromosomes, octopus, …  If you want to see more info about this objects, click on the image to visit this treasury list on Etsy.

What about you? Have you thought of any geeky gift for Christmas?

Screen shot 2012-12-05 at 08.12.52

Ready for Christmas shopping? II

This is my second list to help you with you Christmas presents. This time it is Mathematics. I love all the objects listed below, although my favourite is the first one: the vintage letterpress numbers. I love letterpress! If you want to see more info about this objects, click on the image to visit this treasury list on Etsy.

What about you? Have you thought of any geeky gift for Christmas?

Math geeky gifts

My first exhibition ever

This is very exciting! I did my very first exhibition.

There is this room in the Institute where I work where we usually go for coffee and lunch. From time to time it is also used to host exhibitions. These exhibitions are mostly to show the work of someone who is actually working in the institute, and this time it was my turn!
Here you can see some of the pictures but you’ve got more in my facebook page

https://www.facebook.com/ScienceIsComingToTown

Christmas prize draw !!

Christmas is coming!!! And to celebrate that we are glad to announce a Christmas prize draw!

You will be automatically entered into a prize draw to win a £20 voucher to spend in ‘Science is coming to town’ shop if you do one of the following, before Monday 10th December (10.00pm, UK time). You can enter up to 4 times!!

Twitter: www.twitter.com/sciencetotown

1. Become a follower and retweet our competition message ‘Competition alert: start following us and give us a #ff or #rt this and enter into a prize-draw. See info at: https://scienceiscomingtotown.wordpress.com/2012/11/15/christmas-prize-draw/’ (1)

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ScienceIsComingToTown

1. Like us and share this prize draw: https://scienceiscomingtotown.wordpress.com/2012/11/15/christmas-prize-draw/’ (2)
2. Like us and leave a comment (3)

Blog: https://scienceiscomingtotown.wordpress.com/

1. Become a follower of the blog and leave a comment (4)

Terms & Conditions

– The competition closes at 10.00pm on Monday 10th December (UK time).
– You will be sent a private message with your draw code to your twitter, facebook or wordpress account. If you comment as an anonymous user in the blog, please, email me (scienceiscomingtotown@gmail.com) with your contact details. Email me also if you do not receive your draw code in a couple of days.
– The draw will be made on December 12th 2012 (8.00 am) and the winner announced the same day. Witnesses are welcome.
– The winner will be chosen using an R script to create a vector containing all draw codes. One code will be randomly chosen using the ‘sample’ function.
– Good luck!

Drosophila melanogaster - male

Drosophila melanogaster

At last! I finished my fly. I love it! I hope you do too. You can try making your own one following the instructions below. You can also drop me an email or visit my shop in etsy if you would like to purchase them.

Drosophila melanogaster - male

Drosophila melanogaster – male

 

Drosophila melanogaster - Head and abdomen

Drosophila melanogaster – Head and abdomen

 

Drosophila melanogaster - wing

Drosophila melanogaster – wing

 

Christmas tree ornament.
Design: Drosophila melanogaster (female and male)
Technique: cotton fabric filled with polyester stuffing.
Height: 10 cm (aprox)
Width: 15 cm (aprox)

Instructions to make your own Drosophila melanogaster for your Christmas tree.

The materials you need:

  1. Brown felt for the legs
  2. Brown cotton fabric for the body
  3. Red cotton fabric for the eyes
  4. White cotton fabric for the wings
  5. Black cotton fabric for the abdomen of the males
  6. Thread matching the fabric colours
  7. Polyester stuffing
  8. Taylor chalk
  9. Brown ribbon
  10. Craft knife or scalpel
  11. Fabric scissors
  12. Thimble (optional)
  13. Pins

Then it is time to work on the design. I started with a draft and modified it after a number of proofs.

Once you are happy with the design it needs to be transferred onto cardboard.

Cut the different pieces out using a craft knife.

Using the cardboard patterns and taylor chalk, mark the fabric and cut the pieces out (2 for the eyes, 2 for the body, and 4 the wings).

First sewing step, the legs: put the two felt pieces together, the one with the marks over the other one and sew them together. Then cut the felt around the sewing line.

The wings: put the two pieces together and sew them together following the line leaving a gap (between the pins) to turn it inside out later (1). Turn the pieces inside out and press (2). Sew all along the border (3). Sew the veins (4).

The body: put the two pieces together with the ribbon in between them placed as indicated (1). I use sellotape to stuck up the ribbon to the fabric. Sew the pieces together following the line leaving a gap (between the pins) to turn it inside out and to stuff it later (2). Turn the pieces inside out and press (3). Embroider five lines at the end of the abdomen using a thick black thread (4).

Stuff it and hand sew opening closed.

Hand sew the eyes, the legs, and the wings. And you got it! I would like to see your own flies. Please email me with your pictures!